Down to the River – Dominguez Canyon Backpack

A weekend backpacking trip to Dominguez Canyon outside of Grand Junction, CO.

 

As I went down in the river to pray 
Studying about that good old way 
And who shall wear the starry crown 
Good Lord, show me the way ! 

One of my favorite places to immerse myself is the Colorado Plateau.   The canyons, washes and arroyos lead to place that seem both mysterious and beautiful.   The stark red rocks against the blue sky are vibrant.  And each turn of the canyon wall seems to be following in the footsteps of ancient people.

The Colorado Plateau is one of those special places seems to always call back.   It is up there with the quiet lakes  in the Maine woods, the High Sierra and The Winds. Place where I always long to return.

Desperately  needing a backpacking fix, my mind naturally turned to this area.  Moab would be too far of a drive. Northern New Mexico would also be a trek.

I then remembered a place I passed many times on the way to and from other places: Dominguez Canyon.

Being only a four hour or so drive, it was just at the raw edge for a weekend backpack.

It would also be snow free and have that wonderful red rock country I so love.  Being so close to Colorado National Monument,  Dominguez Canyon should also prove to have  impressive scenery.

I did not leave until Saturday morning due to a cold I was recovering from.

The later departure time  did let me drive to the area in the daylight. The scenic drive helped to emphasize what I’ve always felt about the American West:  The state lines that make up the states do not reflect the reality on the ground.

Glenwood Springs always felt to me like the last town of the Rockies in Colorado.  It is a border town.  Straddling the line between the Colorado Rockies and the Colorado Plateau.

Somewhere just west of this town, it feels more like the Utah region.  And by the time I arrived near Grand Junction. I truly was in Utah. Perhaps not by state lines, but the geology, culture and “feel” of the area felt more like Colorado’s neighbor to the West.

And like every time I’ve been  in Utah, I was glad to have arrived.

Saddled up, locked the door and off I went into the canyon country of the Colorado Plateau.

Upon arriving at the trail head,  I followed the footprints to the top of the bluff and snapped a photo of the Gunnison River.

I continued my walk along the railroad easement and took a photo from the quiet boat launch.

Crossed “The Gunni” at the trestle and took the shot that seems to be mandatory on this trip 🙂 :

From the trestle, I had a nice look down the river and over to an older bridge that leads to a (closed-off) conservation area.

After the river I entered in Big Dominguez Canyon and was reminded more and more of the parts of Utah I love.

And much like Utah, there were signs of the ancient people…Utes in this case.

Further into the canyon I went. And I further enjoyed my Utah-like bliss.

Down into the canyon, I saw signs of more recent inhabitants.

Further down the “trail” I went. The “trail” become more of a worn path marked by the occasional cairn.

Shortly before exiting the canyon proper and rising to the top of the Uncompahgre Plateau, I made camp for the evening.

Being an overnighter, a luxury was packed that made for pleasant evening in camp.

The plateau was reached and the dirt road walking portion of the trip began.

A last look was taken into the canyon.

Followed the dirt roads for a bit and entered the Wagon Park area.

The plateau was nice, but time to enter the canyon again.

Into the Little Dominguez Canyon area (did some off trail hiking in some washes…delayed me, but was oh-so-beautiful) I went.

Hooked up to the creek, The Gunnison and made it back to the trail head.

It was late. I was tired.

But I was happy.

I needed this trip.  I needed to be out backpacking, sleeping under the stars and being out in Nature.

Dominguez Canyon gave me what I needed at the right time.

All the photos

IF YOU SHOULD GO

Getting There: Take 50 East off I70. Follow 50E for until just after Mile Marker 52.  Turn onto Bridgeport Rd for ~3 miles or so to get to the TH.

The Route: The classic loop is ~35 miles connecting “Big D”  and “Little D” canyons with some dirt road walking in the Wagon Park area.  The portions of both canyons near the river are well used and easy to follow.  Further away? Not so much.  A decent amount of people seem to make base camp near the creek and explore the area with a day pack.

Maps:  This map is decent for general navigation esp near the river. You’ll want to bring a topo for the more detailed navigation needed away from the popular areas and/or exploring the washes, however. UPDATE: Apparently Trails Illustrated Map #147 covers this area now. Enough details that it looks serviceable.

Water: In the spring, water flowed quite abundantly in the Little D and Big D canyons. On the dry plateau, plan appropriately.

When to go:  Fall and Spring are ideal.  Spring will have more water. Winter is going to have less people but it can get cold (and there will be less water). Summer? Too hot!!!

Post-hike: I finished too late and had a longish drive back to enjoy any post-hike libations.  If you have the time, the area is known for its wonderful peaches and wine!   I keep up promising a past partner a wine tasting sometime post trip. 🙂

 

Share

9 Replies to “Down to the River – Dominguez Canyon Backpack”

  1. Awesome trip report. I’m very interested in doing a loop up thru Big Dominguez and back out Little Dominguez. Believe it or not, yours is the first report of it I’ve seen. Another hiker had a report that the trip down Little Dominguez was so bad (as far as route finding) that they turned around. He claimed that a BLM ranger stated that leg alone took about 3-5 days! Because of that info I actually canceled the hike and went to Coyote Gulch instead.
    Any advice on connecting the roads through Wagon Park to get to Little D? I have the Trails Illustrated topo of the area. Do you have a GPS track of your trip?
    About how many days do you figure is reasonable to do this?

  2. Hi Ravi, I did this trip as overnighter. Three days is probably more relaxing for most. Navigation in the wagon park area is tricky, and the trail basically non-existent for a while, so you need good navigation skills. A copy of the portion of the 7.5 quad is strongly suggested. I do not own a gps, so now tracks unfortunately. Have fun! Great area.

  3. Paul- awesome trip report! Thanks for putting this (and many others) together. I’m coming from BPL and had a couple questions specific to this loop, so I figured I’d post here.

    When navigating between Big D and Little D, did you cut across on the Dominguez Trail or did you loop all the way around by Carson Hole where Big D narrows off? I’m trying to get a sense of distance and where to cut across and start navigating by compass and not just following the canyon walls.

    Also, would it be more straight-forward to navigate this loop from Big D to Little D (counter-clockwise) or Little D to Big D (clockwise)? I’d like to keep things simple and if there are clear trails coming out of Little D as it seems on the topo, I’d probably start in Little D and go clockwise.

    Thanks!

    • Thanks for the kinds words!

      Looking back on it, I should have indeed gone UP Little D as the navigation is indeed a little harder. (Though the newer TI map has the roads laid out quite nicely).

      Big D is more used and was easier to follow. Six of one; half dozen of the other 😉

      As for my route, I did some off trail scramblicious fun (at the cusp of my ability..don’t tell my wife! :D) from the Wagon Park area and into the canyon. A safer alternative would be Wagon Park to Winter Camp Trail and around to Black Point (possibly cross country) and into the canyon.

      Hope that helps.

      • Got it. Thanks!

        Are there any routes you recommend to get up from Little D to the Wagon Park plateau? It looks like coming around No Mans Mesa might work, but it’s tough to tell from the topos and it’d be nice to stay on the floor canyon longer if possible.

        • Without knowing your technical and navigation skills, hard for me to suggest a specific route. Have to make a judgement in the field based on your on personal safety, skill and comfort levels. Enjoy the loop!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Subscribe without commenting